Premier League reveals wage referral plans

The English Premier League won't restart in May, officials have confirmed.
The English Premier League won't restart in May, officials have confirmed.

English Premier League clubs have unanimously agreed to consult with their players concerning a 30 per cent wage deferral to assist with the payment of non-playing staff during the pandemic.

It was also acknowledged that the season could not begin in May, with the restart date to be kept under constant review.

EPL players and clubs have come under fire after some furloughed non-playing staff but not looked at players' wages during the coronavirus crisis.

British Health secretary Matt Hancock said on Thursday soccer stars should "take a pay cut and play their part."

EPL shareholders met on Friday and confirmed talks will be held with a view to wage cuts.

The league also confirmed an immediate advance of STG 125million ($A255 million) to the lower tier EFL and the National League.

All football in Britain had provisionally been suspended until April 30 because of the outbreak but after Friday's meeting the league's position of a restart date is "under constant review."

"In the face of substantial and continuing losses for the 2019-20 season since the suspension of matches began, and to protect employment throughout the professional game, Premier League clubs unanimously agreed to consult their players regarding a combination of conditional reductions and deferrals amounting to 30 per cent of total annual remuneration," a statement from the Premier League read.

"This guidance will be kept under constant review as circumstances change. The league will be in regular contact with the PFA and the union will join a meeting which will be held tomorrow between the league, players and club representatives."

On the subject of the season restarting, the statement said: "It was acknowledged that the Premier League will not resume at the beginning of May - and that the 2019-20 season will only return when it is safe and appropriate to do so.

"The restart date is under constant review with all stakeholders, as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic develops and we work together through this very challenging time."

Teams still have nine or 10 games left to play, with Liverpool - the leaders by 25 points - still needing two more wins to clinch its first title since 1990.

Meanwhile, European soccer's governing body UEFA, in a letter signed by the European Clubs' Association and the European Leagues, has urged members not to abandon their competitions.

Halting leagues without their approval could see teams blocked from qualifying for the Champions League and Europa League as they are determined based on final positions in domestic standings, UEFA warned earlier on Friday.

Australian Associated Press