Emergency care training for rural Wheatbelt clinicians

TIME TO LEARN: Dr Stephanie Schlueter and Dr Leena Bayly during the workshop. Photo: Supplied.
TIME TO LEARN: Dr Stephanie Schlueter and Dr Leena Bayly during the workshop. Photo: Supplied.

Wheatbelt clinicians have attended a two-day workshop in Merredin to strengthen their caring skills for patients requiring emergency care in rural Western Australia.

The workshop was led by the WA Country Health Service Emergency Medicine Education and Training and was attended by 24 doctors and nurses.

The Emergency Medicine Education and Training (EMET) lead Stephanie Schlueter said the program was created to support rural health professionals to confidently and effectively deliver emergency care, and build networks with both metropolitan and country colleagues.

"Through the delivery of real-life simulation scenarios and skills stations, participants are provided with a safe and supportive learning environment to practice and hone their emergency medicine skills," she said.

"Covering everything from paediatrics to adult emergencies, including severe traumatic brain injuries, the program enables a high standard of patient care ultimately improving outcomes for our patients in rural and remote areas.

"Rural and remote health professionals have told us that they really appreciate emergency medicine training travelling to country WA enabling easier access to high level, inter-professional learning without having to leave their town or region."

The EMET program is a national initiative administered by the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health.