"We all need to follow this example" - Environment minister Stephen Dawson comments on Wheatbelt school grants

GRANTS: Two Wheatbelt schools have received state government grants for projects that reduce waste disposed into landfill. Photo: Shutterstock.
GRANTS: Two Wheatbelt schools have received state government grants for projects that reduce waste disposed into landfill. Photo: Shutterstock.

Two Wheatbelt schools have received state government grants for projects that reduce waste disposed into landfill.

The Waste Wise Schools (WWS) program delivers educational resources aimed at changing behaviour to avoid the generation of waste and encourage diverting waste from landfill.

In total, more than $35,000 has been granted to Western Australian schools.

St Joseph's School in Northam has received $1,763.94 to set up compost bins, worm farms, paper making, brick making and buying containers for food recycling.

St Joseph's School in Moora has received $1,883.98 to set up compost bins and worm farms to recycle organic waste.

West Australian environment minister Stephen Dawson said the grants would make a difference to regional schools.

"I am pleased to see the avoid, reduce, reuse, recycle culture at Western Australia's schools - they are leading the behaviour change we need to avoid waste and minimise the amount we send to landfill," he said.

"We all need to follow this example being set by our kids.

"We all have a responsibility to do the right thing and adopt smarter ways to manage our waste at home, at work and at school."

Accredited WWS schools are empowering their community by spreading the 'avoid, reduce, reuse and recycle' messages and providing their students and community with practical activities that raise awareness and reduce waste.