Graduate returns to college to share skills with new batch of students

College return: Former Muresk Insitute student Amy Corsini with Central Regional TAFE School of Agribusiness head professor Christine Storer and her students from Narrogin. Photo: Supplied.
College return: Former Muresk Insitute student Amy Corsini with Central Regional TAFE School of Agribusiness head professor Christine Storer and her students from Narrogin. Photo: Supplied.

A former Muresk student, who returned to the institute for an open day with a class of her students, has praised staff for their dedication and teaching that led her to a career in the agriculture industry.

Amy Corsini, originally from a farming family in Westonia, returned to the Muresk Institute in Northam for last week's FarmSmart Showcase.

Miss Corsini completed all her education through the ag-school system including the Cunderdin College of Agriculture and the Muresk Institute, where she completed the Charles Sturt Agribusiness degree in 2016.

The Wheatbelt local went on to a one-year teaching degree that has led her to teach at Western Australian College of Agriculture Narrogin for the past two years.

Miss Corsini said the knowledge she gained at Muresk had helped grow her passion for the industry.

"Because I am teaching plant production, the cropping units, even the business planning units have come into good use," she said.

"Now that I'm teaching it I actually understand it a whole lot more."

Miss Corsini said the FarmSmart showcase was vital in growing students' understanding of the ever-changing agriculture industry.

"Days like today show the technology advancements - people need to find more efficient ways of doing things," she said.

"Bringing the kids today, it is important for them to know what the industry is like - as they are only a year out."

Central Regional TAFE School of Agribusiness head professor Christine Storer said having students like Miss Corsini sharing her knowledge with the future generations was vital in creating a strong agriculture industry.

"The reason why we have had such a shortage of people in the agribusiness industry is because through the high school system students aren't aware of the importance of food globally, but especially in WA," she said.

"Half the jobs are city based and half are in the country - a lot of people don't realise there is a whole world of work available.

"Having someone who is from a rural area, who was trained in an agricultural college and is teaching at one, is important because they make students aware of the wide range of opportunities available to them."

Professor Storer said she was proud to have Miss Corsini as an alumni of the institute.

"Amy was always a very enthusiastic and conscientious student and took all the opportunities to have a good time," she said.

"She is there to give that perspective to young people that there are interesting things out there for rural people."