Wooroloo Primary takes healthy step forward as part of Walk Safely to School Day

Wooroloo Primary School students Tahlia Clothier Gardiner, Levi Van Der Swaagn, Hunter Backer and Addison Keane are set to take part in the 20th anniversary of Walk Safely to School Day on Friday.
Wooroloo Primary School students Tahlia Clothier Gardiner, Levi Van Der Swaagn, Hunter Backer and Addison Keane are set to take part in the 20th anniversary of Walk Safely to School Day on Friday.

Students around the state are getting ready to put on their walking shoes for the 20th anniversary of Walk Safely to School Day on Friday.

Wooroloo Primary School is one of many schools taking place in the event.

Walk Safely to School Day is a community event initiated by the Pedestrian Council of Australia that encourages children to build walking into their daily routine, as well as raising awareness around the health, road safety, transport and environmental benefits that regular walking can provide.

The annual event, initiated by the Pedestrian Council of Australia, raises awareness of the health, road safety, transport and environmental benefits that regular walking can provide.

The day also encourages primary school aged children to build walking into their daily routine, by walking to and from school, not just on Walk Safely to School Day but every day.

Pedestrian Council of Australia chief executive Harold Scruby said physical inactivity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases that can affect kids at different stages of their life.

"One in four children in Australia is overweight or obese, and it is expected that numbers will reach one in three by next year," he said.

"We really need teachers, parents, carers and the community at large to get behind this event and its objectives, the best exercise for all of us is regular walking.

"Children require at least 60 minutes huff and puff physical activity every day.

"We should encourage them to include walking at the beginning, during and end of each day - if you can't walk all the way, use public transport and get off the bus, train, tram or ferry a few stops earlier and walk the rest of the way to school."

National Walk Safely to School Day also encourages parents and carers to walk more, reducing dangerous traffic congestion around schools, better use of public transport with reduced car-dependency and the vitally important road safety message:

"Until they are 10, children must always hold the hand of an adult when crossing the road," Mr Scruby said.

The 20th anniversary of Walk Safely to School Day is on Friday, May 17.